Monday, December 24, 2012

Sizzla Rejects J-FLAG Olive Branch .......... oh really?

The so called "Olive Branch" as extended by JFLAG towards "reformed" dancehall acts who call for the deaths of gay persons predominantly gay men was not intended for persons like Sizzla from day one as far as I understood it so to even suggest he qualified or for him to nuff up himself by answering is so narcissistic as he always was and still seem to be based on the article below and his response. I for one never expected him to be included in that group of reformed artists that the J says it wants to reach out to, he has always been defiant even while not performing some of his anti gay selections in a while.

Bearing in mind also he had a show cancelled in Belgium: 

Sizzla cancelled yet again in Belgium from GLBTQJA on Wordpress


Other antigay acts such as Beenieman and Buju Banton now incarcerated on drug charges in the US have used to "long time ago" excuse to say they have moved on years after recording the offensive materials and supposedly signing the symbolic Reggae Compassionate Act but still the songs are available on platforms for sale such as Itunes, played on minibuses exposing them to a younger generation who for the most part use these alternative modes of transport for the hype they bring with the loud music and the lucrative bootleg music industry still thrives in some instances on marketing such materials on cheap $100 per copy CDs everywhere.

See: J-FLAG Stands Behind Dancehall, bats For Reformed dancehall artists 


And with the troubles Sizzla has found himself in lately with the Rastafarian order chief among them the twelve tribes and his supposed seizing of power of leaders of one of the tribes of Israel using seals and all to appoint power to himself at the anger of the elders, threats being issued to administrators and elders alike in alleged rival groups of the order and even passed alleged transgressions of gun crimes at his camp in August Town he would never qualify in my book as a reformed Rastafarian when he seems so full of himself and having a god like status accorded to him. 


Others are said to be in fear of him and his followers in the Nyabingi order that he descries in the Gleaner article below as a theocracy. One can recall his legal woes some years ago when guns were found alleged in his infamous "Judgement Yard" spot where he had a recording studio at the time along with a sound system.



Here is the article that speaks to the "Olive branch" rejection by him:


Thanks, But No Thanks - Sizzla Rejects J-FLAG Olive Branch


Leighton Levy, Gleaner Writer

While Sizzla Kalonji may not be one of the artistes gay lobby groups have called 'reformed', the reggae crooner has strongly rejected the olive branch from the Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals and Gays (J-FLAG), offered to support Jamaican entertainers, who despite toning down their anti-gay rhetoric, have continued to come under attack from gay lobby groups abroad.

J-FLAG recently came out in support of entertainers, who in their judgement, were reformed dancehall artistes who they believe have demonstrated greater levels of tolerance to the homosexual community.

However, Sizzla has no intention of accepting any support from the local gay lobbyists.

"I, personally, as Sizzla and president of the Nyabinghi theocracy, I don't want no sponsor from no homosexual," he declared.

"We are a people of the Almighty God. We are a biblical people. Jamaica is a Bible island. We live by the principle of the Almighty and in our Bible that we read, in the Hebrew Bible, we totally abandon homosexuals. We are against it. So we don't need no support from them. Fire bun!"

Dane Lewis, J-FLAG executive director, in a story published in last week's Sunday Gleaner, said the organisation was concerned about the recent spate of protests and the stance taken by many of the groups who mobilise these actions.

"The truth is we aren't even involved in these anti-murder-music campaigns today and, in most cases, we are alerted of these protests through our local media," Lewis was quoted as saying.

"Every now and again, some protesters might email asking for clarifications on songs and the general situation regarding LGBT Jamaicans. But, to our knowledge, far less hate music is being produced, and even sponsors have been responsive in the effort to make this type of music a thing of the past."

However, J-FLAG's position means very little to Sizzla Kalonji, whose position is one of 'thanks, but no thanks.' In the title track of his 1997 album Praise Ye Jah, a then 21-year-old Sizzla sang:

I see how yuh constantly building churches but while you church defend di slackness as usual rasta no mix up with homo ...

Fifteen years after that song was released Sizzla's stance, clearly, has not changed.



ENDS

Indeed there are some good songs in his repertoire that have gained popularity across the board even in gay parties as a DJ here for some 17 years I have heard other DJs spin them and I too when I used to spin everything before making my decision to discontinue playing murder music acts in my sets also used to spin some of his materials as floor fillers or pull-ups such as 

Gimme a Try
Black Woman and Child
Just One of Those Days
That's Fine With Me (a popular track even today as a floor filler)
I'm With the Girls (a popular track used as an anthemic ode by butch identified lesbians)

Now I only do house and vogue femme indeed house music was founded by gay DJs back in the day so the connection I guess is inevitable.



Older anti gay tracks like this however still get a full fawud (rewind request from patrons via loud shouts or applause) and the artists as Sizzla and Beenieman (All Battyman fi Dead) refuse to separate themselves from the materials although their supposedly non performance of the tracks live they still have a life of their own. The Stop Murder Music campaign overall has to be careful it is not viewed as a censoring mechanism or stifling free speech but there is free speech and then there is responsibility for such made, as I said in a previous post and elsewhere I won't be satisfied however until the artists remove the songs from their repertoire and completely disassociate themselves from such materials then and only then I will accept that they are serious.

This requires a conviction far more than just the symbolism of non performances of the damning tunes when the songs are still pulling in royalties (no matter how large or small) in the artists and producers coffers and shows that the artist/original performer sanctions the work and the evil actions the tunes prescribe, for the most part sanctioning violence, mobbings and executions of homosexuals.

To say one is a Rastafarian and to promote execution of persons just because of difference when the teachings of Rastafari are supposed to espouse purity of heart, livity and other "clean" aspects of life and most of all love and tolerance also bearing in mind Rastas at one point faced extreme prejudice in this country (an older Reggae track says "dreadlocks can't live in a tennament yard") now to see them turn on a minority.



The oppressed has become the oppressor it seems.

Here is a 2009 podcast I had done on the matter:




Where is the love?
Where is the unity?
Out of Many One People ........... where????

In one breath they preach love and on the same tone prescriptive death is directed at homosexuals.


The paradox that is Jamaica, homosocial yet homophobic.


HOMOSEXUALITY - A biological reality

HOMOPHOBIA - A lifestyle choice

UPDATE December 26 a vox pop showed:

The controversial Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals and Gays (J-FLAG) is offering to help dancehall and reggae artistes respond to efforts by gay-rights groups overseas to boycott their performances and music. The Gleaner asked a number of dancehall acts how they feel about the offer.

Ninja Man:

J-FLAG has been working with artistes for years, a just because dem never public with it 'til now. Some artistes are saying dem a bad man and bun out certain things, etc, but I can tell you that 25 per cent of them are gay and 95 per cent of them perform oral sex. I do not want J-FLAG to represent me. Mi nah walk round and look no representation. Throughout the years when me did a look fi people fi represent me, nobody never a help me, so a now dem waan come? Mi nuh want dem sorry fi me. If they want to represent people, they can do so, but do not bring homosexuality into this business. I do not have the right to say who gives a helping hand in the industry, I am not a dictator or politician, so I will not choose no side.

Tony Rebel:

I think it is a good gesture. It is J-FLAG and these other organisations that put it out there to the public that dancehall was simply about hate songs. A lot of those assertions were made by J-FLAG so they know the truth, so now they can clear it up. Is dem start it, so make them continue and clear the air where our music is concerned. The hate songs were sporadic in reggae and dancehall, so when they use those few drops to tarnish the entire industry, that is unfair! But I welcome this initiative.

Freddie McGregor:

J-FLAG put them in that problem and now want to solve it. If people are making murder music, then target those people because now it has affected the entire industry. Artistes sell zero in Jamaica and in other parts of the world now. They created this problem. I never made a song like that because that lifestyle does not concern me. I would not teach my kids about that because that lifestyle does not affect me. What these lobbyists are doing should not affect me, but it does. I have been saying to these artistes that they don't need to be doing these songs, but dem feel like dem bigger than life and now the entire industry is suffering.

Patrick 'Curly Lox' Gaynor of Twin of Twins, LEAD (Leadership for Empowerment of Artistes and Dancehall)

I must say at this time, this sudden change of heart on the part of J-FLAG will, quite understandably, be met by not only us with scepticism, but by a good majority of the dancehall fraternity, as it relates to what J-FLAG's motive or agenda is. Largely due to the fact this is one of the groups responsible for the present state of disrepair that dancehall is experiencing. While we welcome this initiative from any group or individual whose sole objective is the preservation of dancehall and its slowly fading, once-vibrant culture, I must say that the biggest threat we face as dancehall is a severe lack of unity in dancehall based on pettiness and ignorance. We are yet to establish a united body. The gays united against dancehall, a disorganised bunch of convenient scapegoats and dancehall remains blind to the urgent need to unify against all foreign or domestic threats against its survival. No one can help someone who doesn't want to help themself.

Peace and tolerance

H

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